What I Learned From Prom

promdresses

Prom.

In our house, we’ve just recovered from this event.  And maybe some of you have too.  For my part, I was happy that everything went off as planned in more ways than one.If you’ve been thru prom recently with a daughter (and yes, its kind of like a long distance run) then you know that the night actually begins about a month or two before when the dress is purchased, hair styles are chosen and the make up is researched.  I actually think that we spent more time and energy on this event than I did when I got married.  And I did that twice.I learned some interesting things from Prom this year.  I learned that you post your dress on a site when it is purchased so that no one else wears the same dress.  I learned that if you are a Junior girl going to prom, you are supposed to wear a short dress.  Only Senior girls get to wear long dresses.  If this sounds like a crazy rule, then you are correct.  I also learned that boys are “required” to do a “promposal”.  This is where the boy asks the girl to prom in a very public way, like a proposal.  Yet another new tradition I find ridiculous and frankly if I were a teenage boy, would make me want to run the other way screaming.

However, with all the craziness of what prom is, I do find it really refreshing that there is a process, a plan, if you will of how to prepare for an event that most young women follow.

And it got me to thinking, why don’t we as adults do more of that as well?

So here’s my recommendations that many of you have heard before when planning for an event whether it be an important meeting, presentation, benefit or auction.

Start 1 month before the event and look through your closet.  Is there something there that you love and feel great in? Consider wearing it before buying anything new.  After all, most people don’t remember what you wore to a previous event.

Look at your calendar and then look at your hair and nails.  Set appointments so that your grooming issues are handled and there is no last minute panic.   Do you want to do your own make up or have someone help you?  Make that decision and schedule if necessary.

Once you’ve shopped in your closet for your look or you’ve shopped elsewhere, try the whole look on, top to bottom.  This means hair, make up, jewelry, shoes, etc.  You need that visual so that you can then put this project behind you until the actual event and get on with living your life.

As usual, we can learn something from the kids:  Take the time to treat yourself to a little planning about your look. And be happy that you don’t have to live thru high school again.